Professional Doctorates in Organizational Diagnosis, Design and Teleology

Professional Doctorates in SymbergeticTM Organizational Transformation
with specializations in Diagnosis, Design or Teleology – Not Accepting New Students

Admissions and Special Requirements

Students may enter the Clinical Doctoral program in three ways:
     a) if you have a Master’s Degree and 3-years profit center responsibility, OR
     b) if you have an MBA, OR
     c) if you have a Bachelor’s Degree, extra coursework is required

NOTE: Official Transcripts are required. Overseas students MUST get transcripts evaluated by a U.S. agency that analyses credit for transfer. Agencies such as the ECE or the IERF are qualified. For additional qualified agencies, click here.

NOTE:  Overseas students may be asked to utilize a professional English editor for their written work.

Transfer of credit into or between degree programs at AGS is only accepted as follows:

A) Those who have current (unexpired) Adizes Phase Certification documents, cannot transfer Certifications into the present programs. All classes must be completed while enrolled at AGS.
B) Credit for only one required course, Epistemology or Group Dynamics, may be given by AGS if taken at another University – but only if the student enters the program with a Bachelor’s Degree. Students getting advanced standing for an MBA or other graduate degree outside of AGS cannot transfer additional credit toward the doctorate.
C) Most online courses at AGS transfer between most AGS programs.

Bachelor’s Degree Admissions – Students having only a Bachelor’s Degree can be admitted to the Doctoral Programs, but extra academic coursework is required.

  • Adizes methodology
  • System Lifecycles
  • Spiral Dynamics
  • Principles of Therapy and Healing
  • Group Dynamics
  • Epistemology
  • Professional Ethics
  • Systems Thinking
     
  • Those specializing in Organizational Design must complete Traditional Management Theory

The following notes are for ALL students:

Selecting a specialty – Diagnosis, Design or Teleology

  • The Diagnosis Specialization requires Phase I, II, III only.
  • The Design Specialization requires Phase I, II, III primer. Requires Phase IV, V and VI.
  • The Teleology Specialization requires requires Phase I, II, III, V, VI primer. Requires Phase IV, VIII, IX, and XI.

See below for details regarding each specialization.

Without committing to a degree program, the online courses can still be taken and progress made towards a degree. Almost all online classes transfer across various degree programs and specializations. Passing online courses does NOT guarantee admission to a professional practitioner program, but the online courses can always be applied to any appropriate program at Adizes Graduate School.

Phase Training Required – Each specialty requires the completion of different phases of the Adizes Methodology, usually in on-site training sessions scheduled in advance. The Diagnosis and Design specialty require three Phases, and the Teleology specialty requires four Phases. Primers in other Phases are also required for the Design or Teleology specialization.

On-site Training – The Diagnosis and Design specialties each require one on-site class in Santa Barbara, California. Teleology requires two on-site classes. Travel costs are the responsibility of the student and will be provided in advance.

External (pre-requisite) academic work – Each specialty has at least two different pre-requisite courses required… meaning, courses that are NOT offered at Adizes Graduate School but must be taken prior to beginning Phase training. Alternately, students may petition for a waiver of coursework based upon documented relevant experience. Click on the specialty above for these pre-requisite requirements.

Academic courses at AGS – All of the academic online courses below are required of Doctoral candidates. 

  • Adizes methodology
  • Spiral Dynamics
  • Professional Ethics
  • Epistemology

Final Project – The capstone projects for the Professional Doctoral Degree require a formal case study.  Students should be conscientiously  journaling the evolution of their client company from the start of their first internship, although it is also acceptable to contract with a second company for the doctoral case study if preferable.

The final project is a case study of facilitation with one client using all the phases of the area of study in which the student has specialized OR the documentation of innovations in the field of organizational transformation INCLUDING a case study indicating their success.

There is no viva voce examination required but the written capstone project will be reviewed by a formal Doctoral Committee. Others may be asked to participate including the internship mentor and persons who can provide external validation for the quality and accuracy of work presented in the case.

The formal case study project requires all of the traditional components of a dissertation.  The final project should be formatted according to the most current APA Manual. The student will be responsible for sections which may include a focus question or hypothesis; key research questions; a thorough review of relevant literature beyond Adizes; a discussion of other applicable theories; substantiation of case-study and longitudinal methods; a discussion of bias; identification of population and justification for selection; a discussion of external parameters/factors of influence on the study; a discussion of variables and controls; support for conclusions; suggestions for further study; and etc.

Live internships – Each Adizes Phase requires three Internships and a concurrent online lab. In the first Internship, you observe a Certified Adizes Associate working with your client.  In the second, you assist in delivering material. In the third, you deliver the material yourself with supervision. Phases are never delivered back-to-back in one session. Each Phase requires unique timing and follow-up with each individual client. The student selects their own client. Expenses involved in traveling to the client site are the responsibility of the student but may be offset within the client contract. 

Questions and answers, and details of student or company performance are discussed during the concurrent online labs, which also help you journal your evaluation of company progress for the capstone project.

Internships MUST be set up immediately after a student is accepted to the Adizes Graduate School.  

Credit for Returning Students – A new, complete application to the Graduate School is required in all cases – there will be no exceptions. Any prior balance owed to the School must be paid in order for a student to be admitted to the Professional Clinical Doctorate.

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The Specialty in Organizational Diagnosis ~

Program Content: This course of study is expected to take four (4) years, but could be done in less time with due diligence. As a student, you will learn how to lead the process of self-discovery to be used in organizational diagnosis in ways in which the organization will identify with the diagnosis, and the plan of action, and will create energy for change.  You will learn multiple approaches to team building and group problem solving, what makes teamwork effective, and how to promote functional conflict.  Learn to create a bottom-up structure which enables the organization to have an open system that is open not only to its environment but to itself; how to create a learning organization; and, how to create responsibility for change in the organization which will be taking responsibility on its own.

Specific learning outcomes include:

A. Basic techniques for synergistic organizational diagnosis.
B. Effective techniques for obtaining the active involvement of a company’s managerial team in the organizational transformation process.
C. To guide groups into becoming effective management problem-solving teams and to obtain consensus among a company’s management team regarding tough organizational challenges.
D. How to compose and train teams needed to solve organizational transformation problems identified in the diagnosis.
E.   How to provide leadership upward and to activate the higher rings of the organizational hierarchy.
F.   How to obtain the authority from the organizational power structure to solve organizational problems.
G. To apply these in specific experiential situations and refine experiential competence and skills.  Through the experiential internship activity, students increase their competence and skills in building intra-organization management problem solving teams, conflict management skills, and organizational therapy tasks.

The clinical specialty in Organizational Diagnosis includes the following three content areas

Academic:  

Eight courses are required for students entering the program with a Bachelor’s Degree; 3 courses are required for those who are qualified for advanced standing. All online courses are managed in conjunction with the Adizes Graduate School academic online degree programs – the Masters and the Ph.D. All information regarding the academic online courses applies as well.

The following pre-requisite courses (not available at AGS) are required and must appear on your transcripts or you may submit a written petition for a waiver of these pre-requisite courses (required with the application documents) based on demonstrable professional experience, or take these courses any time prior to Adizes Phase training: 

  • Production or Operations Management
  • Introduction to Statistics

Clinical:

The Diagnosis Specialization requires Phase I – III of the Adizes methodology, including on-site classes, online lab work with supervision, and internships in a client environment.

The Doctoral Project:

The final project is a case study of facilitation with one client using all the phases of the area of study in which the student has specialized OR the documentation of innovations in the field of organizational transformation INCLUDING a case study indicating their success.

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The Specialty in Organizational Design ~

Program Content: This course of study is expected to take four (4) years, but could be done in less time with due diligence. Students learn traditional and current management theory and application, the techniques and tools of analysis and control, the classical concepts of leadership and supervision. They will learn to facilitate the organization in identifying its purpose of existence, including how to “own it,” and how to harness the energy necessary to achieve that goal. They learn how to lead in the design of an organizational structure which minimizes destructive conflict and creates an environment in which conflict is constructive. They will also learn the principles that govern organizational structures in order to create structures that are both controllable and flexible.  Students will learn how to design information systems that make the accountability in an organization transparent so that the responsibility can be monitored, corrective action can be applied in a timely manner, and rewards can be distributed to reinforce desired behavior.

 Specific learning outcomes include:

A.   In-depth training in classical management systems thinking, tools and techniques of management analysis and classical concepts of supervision, leadership, and control techniques and strategies.
B. The fundamental techniques of the “push-pull process” that keeps an organization changing.
C. How to conduct organization therapy sessions that bring people to agreement on the organization’s own value-added competitive advantage and to develop a clear, concise statement of the mission of the organization, identifying their own common, shared sense of vision and mission.
D. How to structure an organization in light of its mission, functions and required individual responsibilities, which clarify accountability to function.
E.   How to overcome organizational colonialism via organizational design, and how to give line functions more control so that staff recognizes its legitimate role. 
F. To match managers’ new responsibilities with appropriate levels of authority, and to wind tunnel-test the new structure and to define and clarify responsibilities within and between units.
G. To enhance the information systems so they document individual accountability for very dollar in and out of the organization, and develop adequate transfer prices, watch profit and loss within each unit, product or other desired reference points.
H. To apply these in specific experiential situations and refine experiential competence and skills.

The clinical specialty in Organizational Design includes the following three content areas

Academic:

Nine courses are required for students entering the program with a Bachelor’s Degree; 3 courses are required for those who are qualified for advanced standing. All online courses are managed in conjunction with the Adizes Graduate School academic online degree programs – the Masters and the Ph.D.  All information regarding the academic online courses applies as well.

 The following pre-requisite courses (not available at AGS) are required and must appear on your transcripts, or you may submit a written petition for a waiver of these pre-requisite courses (required with the application documents) based on demonstrable professional experience, or take these courses any time prior to Adizes Phase training: 

Marketing Theory
Accounting Theory

Clinical:

The Design Specialization requires Phase I, II, III primers, and requires Phase IV, V and VI. Training includes on-site classes, online lab work with supervision, and internships in a client environment. 

The Doctoral Project:

The final project is a case study of facilitation with one client using all the phases of the area of study in which the student has specialized OR the documentation of innovations in the field of organizational transformation INCLUDING a case study indicating their success.

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The Specialty in Teleology ~
Greek teleios, teleos, perfect, complete (from telos, end, result).

Various definitions: The study of design or purpose in natural phenomena. The use of ultimate purpose or design as a means of explaining phenomena. Belief in or the perception of purposeful development toward an end, as in nature or history. The study of evidences of design in nature; a doctrine (as in vitalism) that ends are immanent in nature; a doctrine explaining phenomena by final causes. The fact or character attributed to nature or natural processes of being directed toward an end or shaped by a purpose. The use of design or purpose as an explanation of natural phenomena.

Program Content: This course of study is expected to take five (5) years, but could be done in less time with due diligence.  Students will learn to facilitate the organization in identifying its purpose of existence, how to “own it,” and how to harness the energy necessary to achieve that goal.  Students will learn how to stretch an organization to its peak performance, overcoming the biased interests of different departments and individuals. Other objectives include: learning how to aim for goals that involve risk-taking, how to overcome fear of failure, and how the organization can extend itself. A student learns how to facilitate strategic planning in the organization which capitalizes on core competencies and protects core weaknesses. This objective involves multi-functional and multidisciplinary areas such as Marketing, Production, Finance and Human Resources. Finally, students learn how to lead an organization in designing systems for itself  that will reinforce desired behavior whether that system and behavior are financial or non-financial in nature.

 Specific learning outcomes include students learning:

  1. A. How to conduct organization therapy sessions that bring people to agreement on the organization’s own value-added competitive advantage and to develop a clear, concise statement of the mission of the organization, identifying their own common, shared sense of vision and mission.
    B. How to structure an organization in light of its mission, functions and required individual responsibilities, which clarify accountability to function.
    C. To get an entire team to participate in order to make cost centers perform like profit centers, negotiate transfer pricing between units, and to get business behavior and efficiency even from not-for profit-units of the organization.
    D. To conduct Strategic Planning sessions in light of the previously determined structure, mission and information base, developing strategic long range plans and systems for increasing product lines, market share, profitability, and human resources.
    E. The skills to develop a reward system including economic, non-pecuniary, task, potency and mission rewards, and to jointly develop incentive systems that reflect cooperation, team achievement, and that motivate people.
    F.   Students apply these in specific experiential situations and refine experiential competence and skills.

The clinical specialty in Teleology includes the following three content areas

Academic:

Eight courses are required for students entering the program with a Bachelor’s Degree; 3 courses are required for those who are qualified for advanced standing. All online courses are managed in conjunction with the Adizes Graduate School academic online degree programs – the Masters and the Ph.D. All information regarding the academic online courses applies as well.

 The following prerequisite courses (not available at AGS) are required and must appear on your transcripts or you may submit a written petition for a waiver of these prerequisite courses (required with the application documents) based on demonstrable professional experience, or take these courses any time prior to Adizes Phase training: 

Marketing Theory
Introduction to Operations Research
Strategic Planning
Business Finance Theory
Business Policy
Human Resource Management

Clinical:

The Teleology Specialization requires Phase IV, VIII, IX, and XI; and requires Phase I, II, III, V and VI Primers. Training includes on-site classes, online lab work with supervision, and internships in a client environment.

The Doctoral Project:

The final project is a case study of facilitation with one client using all the phases of the area of study in which the student has specialized OR the documentation of innovations in the field of organizational transformation INCLUDING a case study indicating their success.

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The Professional Doctorates: Online Classes
NOTE:  Overseas students may be asked to utilize a professional English editor for their written work.

Certain online courses are required of all Program candidates who enter with a Bachelor’s degree, including all eight of the academic courses described on this page. A ninth course is required for the Design track. Those who are qualified for advanced standing need only take the Adizes, Spiral Dynamics, Epistemology and Professional Ethics courses.

  • **Adizes methodology: Leadership Tools for Managing Change
  • System Lifecycles
  • **Spiral Dynamics
  • Principles of Therapy and Healing
  • Group Dynamics
  • Epistemology
  • Professional Ethics
  • Systems Thinking
     
  • The Organizational Design speciality also requires Traditional Management Theory

**Accelerated options: Live seminars with short online dialogue sessions maybe be available  -ask your Registrar.

Course Descriptions:

Adizes methodology: Leadership Tools for Managing Change

 In the first portion of this course, students will discuss why organizations tend to grow and age in predictable patterns. In the second module, we will explore various models of personality, work and communication styles. We will learn how to anticipate the quality of decisions others will make and how individuals communicate in styles via this model. Students will gain insight into what to do when individual decision quality needs to be improved, thereby increasing or decreasing the structure of participation within the organization. The third module will include the nature of constructive and destructive conflict; coalesced power, authority and influence; and the factors in both organizational and personal life that enhance or erode trust and respect. We will place special emphasis on the impact of organizational structure on behavior.

Students have the option of taking the formal examination for Adizes Institute Certification in Phase 0 for credit in lieu of this course, or to Certify at the end of this course.
 
System Life Cycles

This seminar examines life cycles at the level of individual, family, organization, and civilization. Life cycle and stage theories will be presented from the perspectives of human development, organizational studies, and the growing field of sociobiology. Classic analyses of civilizations, such as those presented by A. J. Toynbee, and the renewed interest in such studies spurred by The Rise and Fall of Great Powers by Paul M. Kennedy, will also add to participants’ understanding of life cycle phenomena. These theories and analyses will be applied to how behaviors and relationships in one context or development cycle interact with another.

Spiral Dynamics 

Spiral Dynamics is an evolutionary-based framework that constructs scaffolding for different theories of management, leadership, motivation, organizational design, communication, and social change. As such, this approach creates a framework for systems that are appropriate to the purposes of the organization.  Based on the original work of the late Professor Clare W. Graves, this conceptual system examines eight levels of human existence, describes the new language of memetics as a way of understanding the awakening and migration of ideas and life forms, and offers a closely woven companion track to thinking in sequences and lifecycles. This final stage is entitled Meshwork’s Solutions and it maps out specific strategies and tactics in the “meshing” of healthy systems. The course will examine the deep tributaries that produced this crossroads in development; analyze the research methodology that generated the theoretical statement; and will then move quickly into specific applications in the worlds of business, government, religion, education, politics, sports, media, and social transformation. 

Principles of Healing

In addition to an overview of Western therapeutic interventions, including the basic tenets of psychoanalytic theory, humanist theories and theories based in social psychology, this course presents comparative principles of healing drawn from non-allopathic therapeutic systems, shamanism, Buddhism, Zen, and Taoism. Students are expected to prepare an in-depth paper reviewing one major theory and applying the principles of that theory to their own organizational or client environment.

Epistemology 

The Nature and Evolution of Knowledge: This course exposes participants to a full range of “ways of knowing” and their implications for organizational life. Both classical and contemporary theories of knowledge and their evolution are explored at the individual, cultural and societal levels. We will trace the roots of the modern western mind through the rationalist versus empiricist orientations to knowledge, the evolution of science and the rise of post-modernism. We will further examine the profound ways in which certain limited orientations to knowledge continue to pervade nearly every aspect of contemporary life. Informed by a deeper understanding of our own orientation to knowledge, we will examine the emerging phenomenon of the knowledge society and the unprecedented epistemological demands being placed on today’s management together with their implications for contemporary management theory.

Systems Thinking 

Systems thinking began, and remains, a multi-disciplinary field. It is first grounded in Cartesian thought in the West. Eastern thought, found in Buddhism, Hinduism, and other spiritual practices, inform us as well. Systems thinking is the process of examining organizations as complex living systems. It is a conceptual framework that identifies and defines shared realities which groups and organizations can use to understand and solve problems. As a foundation, and a practice, it has the potential to transform the ways in which we perceive, think, and make meaning.

Professional Ethics

This course focuses on ethical issues confronted by individuals in carrying out their managerial and professional responsibilities.  The application of moral concepts to practical ethical decision making is emphasized. The obligations of business to the community and society at large are also discussed. Topics include ethics theory and applications of critical thinking; organizational and personal responsibilities; ethics and values in a global community; law and ethics: convergence and divergence; rights and obligations of employers and employees; and emerging ethics issues.

Group Dynamics

This course will focus on major theories, models and applications of group dynamics and processes. We will analyze evolutionary stages of groups, roles and conflict in group dynamics, and the appropriateness of various types of groups such as structured, unstructured, and open boundary. We will review theories of psychological processes in groups (transference, counter – transference, boundaries, etc.) and how to appropriately apply these processes. We will focus on the use of group dynamics in group psychotherapy, organizational change processes, team building workshops, etc. This course will also focus on the practical aspects of group dynamics such as defreezing exercises, starting and ending groups, developing group cohesiveness, encouraging appropriate risk taking, becoming an engaged group member, and becoming an effective group leader.

Traditional Management Theory (only required of students in the Organizational Design track) – This course will cover management theory from a structuralist point of view. The course will include discussion regarding the process of planning and how to design systems of monitoring so that the plans are appropriately monitored and corrected if there are discrepancies.

Questions we will explore in this course:

  • How to appropriately structure an organization
  • How to appropriately staff an organization
  • How to appropriately delegate authority
  • How to appropriately decentralize an organization

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Phase Training:

The Professional Doctorates (DDT):
The taught Phases of Adizes methodology

Phase O – “Phase zero” is considered the Conceptual  Foundations of the Adizes methodology. This is taught in the online class, or tested in a formal Certification Exam, either of which is required as a pre-requisite to any further learning in the Clinical Programs.

Lecturer’s Program (1 unit, 2 days)

Prior to proceeding with training in the intervention techniques of the methodology, it is necessary not only to have a functional knowledge of the theoretical aspects of the methodology, but also to be able to present the Phases to others. This course provides that capability by teaching the students how to effectively present the material to achieve the most effective interventions for organizational transformation. It also serves as the cornerstone for all future training by thoroughly educating students into the theory which underlies the methodology.  Only through teaching do students fully begin to comprehend all the dimensions to the methodology and really know the material themselves.

The 2 day program is designed to teach people how to lecture the material embodied in the theory underlying the Adizes methodology, how to organize a lecture so that there is “take-home value” for the audience every 15 minutes, which topics are suitable for which audiences, and how to field questions from the audience pertaining to the methodology.

The program is composed of lecture, question and answer sessions and oral examinations in which each student presents a concept of the methodology and is then critiqued by other members of the class.  

Phase I-III Primer (4 units, 8 days)

This is an overview course (Phase I, II, and III described below) in which students gain the theoretical knowledge of the Diagnosis phase of the methodology in order to understand the foundational work performed with clients.  They also gain knowledge of multiple approaches to team building and group problem solving, what makes teamwork effective, and how to promote functional conflict. Students also learn how to create responsibility for change in the organization which will be taking responsibility on its own.

This course also includes significant content on managing conflict.  Individuals learn the skills for leading organizations and the top management in identifying, analyzing and solving functional problems of organizational transformation without a “witch hunt” and without personal attribution of fault. Concepts, rules, preparation, room set-up, and all the minor details essential to the success of managing problem solving teams and arriving at consensus are taught and reviewed.  

Phase I – Syndag – Synergetic Diagnosis (3 units, 6 days)

“Syndag” is an acronym for synergetic organizational diagnosis, which reflects that the diagnosis is conducted as a team process requiring the active involvement of the company’s managerial team. This is the first phase of organizational intervention with the Adizes methodology. Participants learn how to conduct such a participative holistic diagnosis. 

Those who complete this course will know how to lead a group of top executives or workers (up to 20 people) in a process at the end of which the whole group reaches a consensus regarding what problems the organization has, how to solve them, where the organization is on the lifecycle and what to do about it. There will be agreement, mutual respect and trust, and team building as a result of the process.

Phase I Internship (7 units, 105 hours)

During the Phase I internship, a Syndag™is practiced on an actual client. The number of days can vary based on the size and complexity of the organization and the number of participants in the synergetic diagnosis.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students will develop their abilities to apply a Syndag™on an actual client.
  2. Students will learn to evaluate their effectiveness in facilitating an organizational diagnosis.
  3.     Students will acquire increased competence in implementing organizational transformation intervention techniques.

Phase I – Online Lab Supervision (2 units, minimum of 30 hours)

  1. Students will increase their sophistication and expertise in conducting a Syndag™for an organization.
    2. Students will increase their competence in preparing a diagnostic report.
    3. Students will increase their ability to integrate, review and feedback into the learning of the diagnostic method.

Phase II – Synerteams  (3 units, 6 days)

Concepts, rules, preparation, room set-up, and all the minor details essential to the success of managing problem solving teams and arriving at consensus are taught and reviewed.  The work for this course is highly experiential and involves work in small groups in order to practice the facilitation of managing teams. Students will learn to lead teams in problem solving sessions and to harness destructive conflict and make it constructive.

The most difficult problems in organizations require cooperation between several individuals and required teamwork does not easily occur in organizations.  The Integrators training course is designed to teach participants to provide managers with the special skills and hands-on experience to those individuals who will be working with problem-solving teams.

Those students who complete this phase will know how to lead teams in problem solving sessions where the solution will be implemented promptly, with the full support of the organization and as a product of increased mutual respect and trust in the team. They will learn to harness destructive conflict and make it constructive.

Phase II Internship (5 units, 75 hours)

Group dynamics and management of conflict are critical during this phase.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students increase their competence in building effective intra-organization management problem solving teams.
    2. Students acquire increased conflict management skills
    3. Students increase their competence in performing organizational therapy tasks.

Phase II – Online Lab Supervision (2 units, 30 hours)

  1. Students will enhance their knowledge of how to compose and train teams needed to solve organizational transformation problems identified in the diagnosis.
    2. Students increase their competence in being team integrators and in leading discussions toward consensus.
    3. Students learn how to teach managers in organizations improved problem solving skills.
    4. Students will increase their ability to lead teams to an agreed upon solution strategies for organizational change.

Phase III – POC Implementation Follow Up (1 unit, 2 days)

This course explores best practices on how to lead an organization through a meeting where problems are prioritized, tasks are defined, problems solving teams are formed and later they are followed up on to make sure that they either have or will accomplish their goals within the time frame provided.

This course focuses on managing conflict.  Participants learn how to provide leadership upward, to activate the higher-ups in the organizational hierarchy, to get the authority needed to solve problems for which a particular manager is responsible. Participants learn how to enlist the support of top management to whom they would not usually have access.  In this course, individuals learn how to have organizations identify, analyze and solve functional problems without a witch hunt, and without personal attribution of fault.

Phase III Internship (5 units, 75 hours)

The Phase III Internship involves the facilitation of multiple top management strategic and creative meetings. Assistance will be provided both with regard to the managing committee and conducting POC sessions. Group dynamics and management of conflict are essential during this phase, as with Phase II. 

The actual course content is determined by each student and their needs. Some students will find they need additional assistance in fielding client questions, handling group conflict, keeping the process moving, identifying “capi”, managing resistance, promoting continuance of the practice of the methodology, or any number of other possible issues that arise in the course of a the facilitation of phase III. The instructor is available throughout the internship to be of assistance in any of these areas.

Phase III – Online Lab Supervision (2 units, 30 hours)

Students will share their experiences across cultures, company size, and stage of organizational lifecycle to mutually enhance each class member’s body of knowledge. Students will share their successes, “failures” and questions that arise in the process of observing and/or facilitating the course material in a client setting in order to learn from the experiences of others and shorten their own learning curve.

Phase IV – Mission Definition/Synerscope (2 units, 4 days)

This course consists of an onsite class and exam, an internship and online labs and instructs participants to be facilitators of the push-pull process that keeps the organization changing. 

Participants learn how to conduct sessions that will bring all participants to agreement on a clear, concise statement of the mission of the organization which will be understood and owned by the group.  In this phase the organization’s real value-added and competitive advantage are identified, building a sense of vision or mission for achieving a common direction and common goals that have the full support and commitment of the managerial team.

Special emphasis is placed on the creation of a mission that will provide direct insight into how the organization will be structured (phase V) and thus allow the mission to be acted on and achieved.

Phase IV Internship (4 units, 60 hours)

The internship is a divided into three parts.  The pre-internship (part A) is intended to give students the opportunity to observe live client sessions related to each phase in which they are enrolled prior to attending the on-site training. Following the on-site program, students are expected to assist in performing that phase on a client (part B) and then lead the facilitation of a phase with a client under supervision (part C).

Conducting Phase IV (Mission) on an actual client generally takes approximately 4 days depending on the number of participants and the size and complexity of the organization. Students spend a minimum of 4 days in Part A of the internship and a minimum of 8 days in Parts B & C.

Phase IV – Supervised On-line Lab (2 units, 30 hours)

Here, special attention is given to client and facilitator’s interaction as participants share their experiences. When to “push”, when to ease; how to push without being “overpushed” back; when to be silent and let the silence do the work; when to move fast and when to slow down; how to hear what is not being said; and understand what is being said by interpreting styles correctly. 

Primer Phase V – Structure (1 unit, 2 days)

Students receive an overview on the design of an organization structure which minimizes destructive conflict and creates an environment in which conflict is constructive. They will also learn the principles that govern correct organizational structures so that they are both controllable and flexible.

Students will not be facilitating the design of a structure for organizational transformation, but will learn the theoretical underpinnings of designing structures which support the mission, matches the organization’s technology, and responds to the environment with goals of producing vitality, entrepreneurship and growth, and mission.

Phase V – Organization Design  & Structure (2 units, 4 days)

This course enables participants to facilitate the design of a structure that supports the mission, matches well with the organization’s technology and responds to the environment with a goal of producing vitality, entrepreneurship and growth.  Participants learn to conduct an analysis of organizational functions and individual responsibilities to determine if they are appropriate for the company’s new needs, and to facilitate the assignment of responsibilities and a clarification of accountability.

In light of the mission (Phase IV), Phase V focuses on organizational structure. This course instructs students to facilitate the design of a structure that supports the mission, matches well with the organization’s technology and responds to the environment with a goal of producing vitality, entrepreneurship and growth. Participants learn to conduct an analysis of organizational functions and individual responsibilities to determine if they are appropriate for the company’s new needs, and to facilitate the assignment of responsibilities and a clarification of accountability.

Phase V Internship (8 units, 120 hours)

The internship is a divided into three parts.  The pre-internship (part A) is intended to give students the opportunity to observe live client sessions related to each phase in which they are enrolled prior to attending the on-site training. Following the on-site program, students are expected to assist in performing that phase on a client (part B) and then lead the facilitation of a phase with a client under supervision (part C).

This course provides students with the opportunity to observe the development of a company’s overall restructuring. Some of the key facilitation issues include:

– How to handle multiple agendas correctly
– How to avoid political pitfalls while participatively restructuring an organization
– How to push without being overly pushed back
– How to handle client’s emotions when client becomes aggressive or hostile
– How to maintain the flow of change
– How to handle those who perceive themselves as losers in the organizational change
– How to maneuver the political power structure, how to read it and avoid being sucked into it
– How and when to finalize or not finalize a structure
– How to appoint people into the structure (staffing decisions)

Phase V Online Supervised Lab (2 units, 30 hours)

Students work collaboratively on-line, sharing their experiences, in order to enhance their knowledge of how to facilitate the design of a structure for organizational transformation which supports the mission, matches the organization’s technology, and responds to the environment with goals of producing vitality, entrepreneurship and growth, and mission.  Students increase their competence in managing group process and conflict in designing an organizational structure. Students increase their capabilities in defining organizational units, flow of authority and span of control.

Primer Phase VI – Accountability Systems (1 unit, 2 days)

Students will learn and overview of the theory of how to design information systems that make the accountability in an organization transparent so that the responsibility can be monitored corrective action can be applied in a timely manner, and rewards can be distributed to reinforce desired behavior.

Students learn the critical points to examine in redesigning an organization’s information systems so that they will fit the new structure and support the decision making process of the organization. They also learn the fundamentals of how to evaluate whether an organization is achieving its new Mission.

Phase VI – Responsive Accountability Systems (2 units, 4 days)

Students learn to lead top management to redesign their information systems so they will fit the new structure and support the decision making process of the organization as well as lead management to identify whether or not it is achieving the new Mission. This is a process in which the facilitator must be able to encourage openness, sharing and cooperation of information rather than the use of information as a source of power. 

Phase VI Internship  (7 units, 105 hours)

Students will learn how to design information systems that make the accountability in an organization transparent so that the responsibility can be monitored, corrective action can be applied in a timely manner, and rewards can be distributed to reinforce desired behavior. Phase VI is unique in that in addition to the complex group processes, a significant amount of time may be spent in preparing materials for the client or working individually with the organization’s CFO and/or Management Information experts/programmers.

Phase VI Online Supervised Lab (2 units, 30 hours)

Students work collaboratively on-line, sharing their experiences, in order to enhance their ability to work with an organization’s financial and accounting systems in order to appropriately match responsibility and authority as well as the ability to enhance the information systems so they document individual accountability for every dollar in and out of the organization, and other key indicators.

Phase VIII – Peak Performance of Organizations (1 unit, 2 days)

In this course, students learn how to utilize the power of team work and the transparency created in the Adizes Accountability system to increase income and reduce costs, effectively “stretching the organization to peak performance.” The focus is on how the staff can better serve the line, how to streamline support activities and push for higher levels of performance, breaking through organizational parochialism.

Phase VIII Internship (1 unit, 15 hours)

Students learn and demonstrate their ability to:

  • avoid the client taking over prematurely
  • avoid creating too much conflict
  • avoid losing the energy for change
  • develop the commitment and discipline at the client organization

Phase VIII Online Supervised Lab (2 units, 30 hours)

Students work collaboratively on-line, sharing their experiences, in order to enhance their ability to work with an organization’s financial and accounting systems in order to appropriately match responsibility and authority as well as the ability to enhance the information systems so they document individual accountability for every dollar in and out of the organization, and other key indicators.

Phase IX – Strategic and Synergistic Resource Allocation (2 units, 4 days)

This course teaches students how to develop a long-range plan and to create a strategic planning system for increasing product lines, market share and profitability with the top management teams of both profit and non-profit organizations. Participants are given tools to re-evaluate the potential of the organization and develop a new strategy that supports current successes and finds new directions and strategies to replace discontinued activities. The focus of the strategic resource allocation is both on financial resources and on whatever might be the scarce resources of an organization. 

Phase IX Internship (4 units, 60 hours)

This course provides students with the opportunity to observe the development of a company’s strategic plan.  The goal is to learn to create a common vision of the company’s future that has the key management’s full support, involvement and commitment.  In this stage, a capital budget is prepared.

Students will observe and assist in the facilitation of:

  • How to differentiate between policies, strategies and tactics
  • How to avoid tactics becoming strategies and policies and strategies becoming tactics
  • How to avoid premature strategic planning
  • How to match strategic planning with the political power structure

Phase IX Online Supervised Lab (2 units, 30 hours)

Online Lab Learning Objectives:

1. Differentiate between policies, strategies and tactics
2. Avoid tactics becoming strategies and policies and strategies becoming tactics
3. Avoid premature strategic planning
4. Match strategic planning with the political power structure

Phase XI – Synergistic Reward Systems (2 units, 4 days)

This phase deals with both intrinsic and extrinsic reward systems.  The goal of this course is to teach participants how to provide a forum for organizations in which they can jointly develop reward systems that reflect cooperation, team achievement, and that motivate people to perform in a manner consistent with the new mission, goals and accountabilities.  The course also deals with money, personal rewards and recognition. In this course, students learn to identify stake-holders and design a centralized system to reward individual, group, departmental and corporate achievement.

Phase XI Internship (4 units, 60 hours)

In this Phase, students learn how to lead an organization in designing systems that will reinforce desired behavior, whether that system and behavior are financial or non-financial in nature. This course provides students with the opportunity to observe the development of a company’s incentive system.

Students will learn and demonstrate their ability to:

  • enable the client organization to develop its own rewards
  • enable the client to deal with its own pain
  • maintain non-attachment and empower the client

Phase XI Online Supervised Lab (2 units, 30 hours)

Online Lab:  Students will develop increased competencies related to internship work and taught strategies for utilizing and developing rewards and incentive systems.

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The Professional Doctorates in Diagnosis, Design, Teleology
Program Costs

Application documents are provided at the link above.

Each Specialization below (Diagnosis, Design, Teleology) has a different cost because each requires different Phase training, internships, academic classes and lab work. The total costs below include all expenses charged at AGS. Additional expenses for travel, books, internet access and library or other resources, are the responsibility of the student.

NOTE: Students entering the program with a Bachelor’s Degree are responsible for costs below.  Students entering the program with a Master’s Degree have advanced standing and will only pay for 4 online classes.

Variable Expenses: The student is responsible for travel for Phase training in Santa Barbara, California, or elsewhere, and the internship time required at the client facility that you select. Client  contracts should be considered carefully in structuring financial obligations. See notes below.

Internships MUST be set up immediately after a student is accepted to the Adizes Graduate School.   

Internship Set-up – Internships are the cornerstone of practitioner learning at AGS. The following special admissions requirements deal with the supervised Internships in each Doctoral track, and are required in addition to the requirements for admission to the Graduate School overall.

After completing all of the application documents for the Graduate School and after being accepted, students will….

  • be directed to an Adizes Institute Office at which a personal mentor will be appointed.
  • complete an interview regarding presentation skills, and negotiate and secure an employment contract with the Adizes office. The Graduate School is not party to employment agreements but the student will provide the School with a letter from the Office affirming that the contract has been signed.    
  • negotiate and secure a client company in which to practice the adizes methodology via the three required supervised internships (observation or pre-internship, partial delivery, full delivery). The Adizes Institute office and mentor can assist the student with securing a client and a contract. If available, a client may be appointed to the student.  The Graduate School is not party to client negotiations.
  •  sign an Enrollment Agreement for their first course and complete the basic Adizes course with a passing grade.

Securing Contracts – Internships cannot begin until the School receives a letter affirming that employment and client contracts are secured and the Adizes course (or Phase O Certification Exam) is completed with a passing grade.

Employment Contracts and Client Contracts:

1. The student is responsible for securing and maintaining a client host facility in which to intern. If the client withdraws from the program before all internships are completed, the student must secure another client site in order to continue.  The Adizes Office will assist with negotiations in this regard, but it is the student’s responsibility to create this opportunity for internship and the formal doctoral case study. The student should consider all related expenses and potential expenses when negotiating their Employment Contract with an Adizes Office or a host client. The Graduate School will not be party to these negotiations. In this regard….

2. If negotiated, it is possible that compensation may be provided during internships or tuition costs may be reimbursed. In addition, the student should recognize that -depending upon the client location, there may be requirements for travel in order to perform the internships, and travel to Santa Barbara for on-site classes is an additional expense. Any reimbursement or compensation is the responsibility of the student to negotiate within the parameters of their Employment and/or Client Contracts. Financial contributions to the students’ program of study are neither promised, implied, or to be expected in any case.  All financial obligations and potential for liability should be clearly understood and negotiated prior to taking the first course at Adizes Graduate School. The Graduate School is not party to these negotiations. 

Known Expenses:

 Organizational Diagnosis Program Costs: In addition to the $100 registration fee, the following course, lab, and internship tuition costs, and software access fees apply:

  • $1200USD     2-day Lecturer’s Program, 1 credit
  • $8400USD     14-day Phase I-III training, 7 credits
  • $2400USD     Supervised online labwork, 6 credits
  • $4200USD     Supervised Phase 1 internship, 7 credits
  • $3000USD     Supervised Phase II internship, 5 credits
  • $3000USD     Supervised Phase III internship, 5 credits
  • $12,000USD   Doctoral Project – Case Study, 20 credits
  • $16,000USD Eight online academic courses, 40 credits
  • NOTE:  Advanced students only take 4 online academic classes, $8000, 20 credits

Plus software access at $25/month or partial month during the online courses only. The total cost of software access fees varies, but it can be estimated that it will cost a maximum of $100 per course for those courses in session over four calendar months; most are only $75 and optional accelerated courses (Adizes and Spiral Dynamics) may be only $50. At most, this would be a total of $800 for the online academic courses.  There is no software fee for the lab work.

Total Program Cost: $51,100 plus travel, books, internet access and library or other resources

Organizational Design Program Costs: In addition to the $100 registration fee, the following course, lab, and internship tuition costs, and software access fees apply:

  • $1200USD     2-day Lecturer’s Program, 1 credit
  • $4800USD     8-day Primer for Phase I-III, 8 credits
  • $7200USD     12-day on-site Phase IV, V, VI training (in three separate 2 cr. segments)
  • $2400USD     Supervised online labwork (in three separate 2 cr. segments)
  • $2400USD     Supervised Phase IV internship, 4 credits
  • $4800USD     Supervised Phase V internship, 8 credits
  • $4200USD     Supervised Phase VI internship, 7 credits
  • 12,000USD    Doctoral Project – Case Study, 20 credits
  • 18,000USD    Nine online academic courses, 45 credits
  • NOTE:  Advanced students only take 4 online academic classes, $8000, 20 credits

Plus software access at $25/month or partial month during the online courses only. The total cost of software access fees varies, but it can be estimated that it will cost a maximum of $100 per course for those courses in session over four calendar months; most are only $75 and optional accelerated courses (Adizes and Spiral Dynamics) may be only $50. At most, this would be a total of $900 for the online academic courses.  There is no software fee for the lab work.

Total Program Cost: $58,000 plus travel, books, internet access and library or other resources

 Teleology Program Costs: In addition to the $100 registration fee, the following course, lab, and internship tuition costs, and software access fees apply:

  • $1200USD     2-day Lecturer’s Program, 1 credit
  • $4800USD     8-day Primer for Phase I-III, 8 credits
  • $2400USD     4-day Primer for Phase V, VI, 2 credits each
  • $9600USD     12-day on-site Phase IV, VIII, IX, XI training (in 4cr. segments)
  • $0800USD     Supervised online labwork, Phase IV, 2 credits
  • $2400USD     Supervised online labwork, Phase IX & XI, 6 credits
  • $2400USD     Supervised Phase IV internship, 4 credits
  • $0600USD     Supervised Phase VIII internship, 1 credit
  • $2400USD     Supervised Phase IX internship, 4 credits
  • $2400USD     Supervised Phase XI internship, 4 credits
  • 12,000USD    Doctoral Project – Case Study, 20 credits
  • 16,000USD    Eight online academic courses, 40 credits
  • NOTE:  Advanced students only take 4 online academic classes, $8000, 20 credits

Plus software access at $25/month or partial month during the online courses only. The total cost of software access fees varies, but it can be estimated that it will cost a maximum of $100 per course for those courses in session over four calendar months; most are only $75 and optional  accelerated courses (Adizes and Spiral Dynamics) may be only $50. At most, this would be a total of $800 for the online academic courses.  There is no software fee for the online lab work.

Total Program Cost: $57,900 plus travel, books, internet access and library or other resources.

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Clinical Internship Mentors:
Adizes Professional Directors

Internship mentors will be apppointed by the Professional Director of the Adizes Institute. Mentors will be appointed based upon speciality, phase of study, and the students’ location. The Professional Director of each Country Office, in most cases, will be responsible for the preliminary interview, employment contract, client contract, and for supervising the three-stage internship process for each Phase of the adizes methodology.

Students are welcome to contact an Adizes Office Professional Director to discuss the work of the Adizes Institute in further detail. Students in locations that do not have a resident Professional Director, may contact USA or the country office nearest to them. Questions regarding the graduate programs themselves, however, should be addressed to the School.

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Live Sessions in Santa Barbara, California

Attending a live venue in Santa Barbara: It is not a good idea to schedule social, client, or tourist activities any time you attend a live, intensive seminar or training session. Some students have found it worthwhile to come a few days early to acclimate; schedule social, tourist, or client activities in the area; or to have quiet time for advance reading and preparation. Santa Barbara is a lovely tourist destination; early hotel/air/auto reservations are essential.

Spiral Dynamics and basic Adizes seminars are OPTIONAL, but there are significant benefits: Students are required to enrol either in an 11-week online class, or in a class format which includes the live seminar combined with a subsequent online dialogue for graduate credit.  The Adizes seminar is 2.5 days and requires 7 weeks of subsequent dialogue online. The SDi seminar is 6 days and requires 3 weeks of dialogue online. These seminars will overlap one of your regular online classes.

  • Seminars are scheduled twice yearly, in March and November
  • Seminars overlap other coursework so they accelerate completion of your degree program. This is the only time that three academic courses could be completed in one trimester.
  • Seminars are scheduled back-to-back so that you can attend both seminars in one trip.
  • Seminars, particularly SDi, often attract participants from around the world.  They are a wonderful opportunity to engage – live – with other students and faculty, and to see how others are using these concepts in many different cultural, organizational, and societal venues.
  • Seminars add to program cost only because of travel expenses. 
  • Tuition and credit granted for each seminar/dialogue is the same as for an 11-week online class.
  • If you choose to accelerate your degree program, you should seriously limit your other appointments during the intensive seminar timeframe – about 4-5 weeks. Picture this: you could attend two seminars over 9 days and (for 3 weeks thereafter) be involved in two online dialogues, plus your regular online academic course.

Note that the Spiral Dynamics seminar, if selected in lieu of the online course, MUST be attended at the Santa Barbara location. This is the only location that provides a specific focus on leading organizational transformation and that integrates the Adizes concepts.

Attending Phase I-XI classes in Santa Barbara: Students will spend a great deal of very intensive time in on-site Phase training in Santa Barbara, California. There will be required reading and homework almost daily, in addition to final Phase examinations on site. 

On-site class requirements

Diagnosis

Design

Teleology

Phase I, II, III

19 days

   

Phase I, II, III, IV + VI primers, and Phase V

 

26 days

 

Phase I, II, III, V + VI primers, and Phase IV

   

22days

Phase VIII, IX, XI

   

11 days

Attending Phase I-XI internships at client facility:

Each Adizes Phase requires three Internships at a client facilityand a concurrent online lab. In the first Internship, you observe a Certified Adizes Associate working with a client.  In the second, you assist in delivering material. In the third, you deliver the material yourself with supervision.  Questions and answers, and details of the performance are discussed during the concurrent online labs, which also help you journal your evaluation of company progress for the capstone project.

The number of actual days in a live session will vary from client to client depending upon the number of participants, the size of the company, and complexity or scope of the project. The latter two supervised internships may be undertaken back-to-back, but it is more likely that students will need to budget three independent internship sessions for each Phase with a client. There are never times where more than one Phase can be delivered in one client session.

Client site – internship requirements

Diagnosis

Design

Teleology

Phase I, II, III internships

X

   

Phase IV, V, VI internships

 

X

 

Phase IV, VIII, IX, and XI internships

   

X

Approximately 23 hours of client observation or facilitation equals one semester unit for the clinical internship experience. The following are minimum time committments expected for completion:

TIME REQUIRED

Pre-Internship = observation

Two supervised internships – one partial delivery & one full delivery, minimum total time expected

Phase I

5 days

15 days

Phase II

4

12

Phase III

4

12

Phase IV

4

8

Phase V

8

16

Phase VI

6

14

Phase VIII

1

3

Phase IX

4

8

Phase XI

4

8